Google Voice Strikes Out Again

My co-worker and very good friend Patty left me a voice mail yesterday because her husband had taken ill and she was at the hospital.  This is my Google Voice translation of the voice mail she left me:

Hey Kimma, It’s Gary 130 on. Hi Kim and was gonna call you on work phone, but ha. I’m at thehospital right now, so there’s A. at that was going on. Let you know marketing on the phone 3today. What’s going on. It’s probably in the on this morning, the mobile hospital in has been admittedto just care will be here this morning. Yeah think he has we have. Well, it looks like doublepneumonia and blood infection. Excellent. Yeah evening so hi. I’ll catch up with you. Bye. 


https://clients4.google.com/voice/embed/embedPlayer

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My Lazy Sunday

I went to Easton, MA on Saturday to visit with my friend Leslie.  We used to work together at Staples and have remained friends since I left there four years ago.

I arrived at her house around 10:30 and we spent the day together going to a Country Store and a pub in downtown Mansfield.  But while sitting having a salad, I started to not feel so good.  I didn’t think much about it other than the hour and fifteen minute ride home ahead of me after I said goodbye with my old friend. It turned out the ride home was one of the longest of my life because I started getting really sick as soon as I hit Route 495 North.

I felt really flush, my back started getting really sore and an overall feeling of sickness hit me.  It was so bad that I considered pulling over off the shoulder of the highway to tip my seat back and lie down for a bit, but I didn’t want some good Samaritan stopping to ask if I was alright. I just wanted to be home…NOW.  The ride home took forever.

I pulled into the driveway to be met by Spencer and Minnie on the doorstep.  I blew past them in a mad rush to get to the bathroom thinking that I was going to be really sick.  The sickness didn’t come so I got myself to bed after confirming that I wasn’t running a fever even though I felt so hot.

I was sick the rest of Saturday night.  I must have ate something that didn’t agree with me. But it was that kind of sick where no matter how hard I tried, I simply could not get myself into a comfortable position in bed.  I tossed and turned. I moaned and groaned. I cursed myself for eating something that made me so sick and turned a perfectly good day into a bad one.  Finally around 10pm, I swallowed two Tylenol PM’s and hoped for the best.  I finally fell asleep…

So today is Sunday and I’ve done nothing productive other than read the Sunday Telegram and get excited that Price Chopper has the first Pom Wonderful Pomegranates of the season.  I had hoped to go to the grocery store tonight, but instead spent the afternoon watching Season 3 of All In The Family and taking several naps.  I brought my work laptop home with me Friday with the hope that I would be catching up on some things that didn’t get done this past week, but the laptop hasn’t made it out of the bag. Tomorrow’s another day.

It’s been a lazy Sunday.  My pajamas are feeling pretty comfortable right about now as I listen to the wind outside whip around and recall that it was snowing earlier this afternoon before I took my last nap of the day.

I’m not ready to embrace Winter this soon, but am hopeful that it will bring me more lazy Sundays in the coming months.

You Might Be A Redneck…

Apologies to Jeff Foxsworthy, but here goes: 

If you’re buying a pregnancy test while in the check out line at the Dollar Tree store, then you might be a redneck.

I’ve actually seen these pregnancy tests and wondered how accurate they could be?  False Positive?  I think so.  But really…do the results of a $1.00 pregnancy test even matter if you’re buying it at The Dollar Tree store? Seriously. Don’t buy such an important life-changing boxed test just because it’s at eye-level next to the AA batteries in the check out line.

I used to take my mom to the Dollar Tree store at least twice a month.  It was where she got the most bang for her buck.  She loved walking down the aisles and seeing all the stuff she could buy for only a dollar because the price point on nearly everything fell within the range of her monthly fixed income of $60.00.  She bought knickknacks and bags of house branded snacks.  I kept myself occupied during these excursions by hanging out in the candy aisle scoping out limited edition Skittles and Dark Chocolate bars that didn’t sell so well when they were originally introduced for mass market consumption.
The Dollar Tree store was where I found cute little “First Place, Second Place and Honorable Mention” ribbons to give to my co-workers this past Christmas for recognition of their creative quotes throughout the year.  

The Dollar Tree also has a great paper goods section and I loved getting lost looking for really unique gift bags and funny greeting cards that were passed over years ago from American Greetings. The sentiments remained the same.

Since my mother passed away, going into the Dollar Tree store  feels really taboo to me.  I have gone into the Dollar Tree a few times and I swear I can feel the ghost of my mother. She haunts me in the aisles calling out my name and I smile sadly to myself when I see all the ugly little trinkets that she loved so much cluttering up the shelves of seasonal displays.  Quite simply, I shouldn’t be shopping at The Dollar Tree anymore.
And I’m pretty sure that if I suspect I might be pregnant, I’m splurging and buying the pregnancy from the local drugstore.  They just better have the CVS brand in stock or I’m off looking for fuzzy bunnies.

 

8 Simple Ways To Enjoy Life Every Day

In reading a recent entry on the Pick The Brain blog, a list was featured of 8 Simple Ways To Enjoy Life Every Day. Peter suggests starting out small and adding things to your day that make you happy.

I read over his list and decided to steal his headers and add my own perspective on what can/would/does make me happy:

1. Appreciate Beauty
The birds are starting to fly south (if they haven’t already) and I’m taking the time to look up into the trees when I hear a bird chirping, singing or making an interesting sound. Sometimes it’s not even the sounds. I was sitting in the Bose cafeteria the other day having lunch when this little burst of red came flapping up against the window. It was a male cardinal which is just not the kind of bird you would expect to see on The Mountain. We Bose workers are accustomed to seeing flocks of junk birds swirling around or the occasional hawk. But here’s the cool thing about paying attention to such things. The reason why the cardinal was attracted to the window was someone had left a red plastic bag on the floor which was visible from the outside and I suspect the cardinal was trying to fly at it. A few moments later we saw the female cardinal in the vicinity of the window doing nothing except patiently waiting for her mate to stop his foolishness of bumping against the window. I’m glad I was paying attention that day.

2. Connect With Nature
I bought this inexpensive little bug vacuum at the store a while back and we use it often in the house to save bugs rather than needlessly killing them. The bug vacuum has helped me connect with nature because I use it to suck up the spiders instead of stomping on them in disgust. Spencer does a much better job of saving the insects than I do because he makes a concerted effort to even suck up ants which to me seem less of an insect than a spider, but who am I to demonstrate class structure in our household? As gross as it is to corner the bug and suck it up into a big plastic tube while fighting my insect phobia, I feel much better about releasing bugs back into the wild rather than killing them. The insects and I have a connection.

3. Laugh
I am so lucky to work with a bunch of people who make me laugh during the day. Sometimes I have so much fun at work over that I can’t believe I’m getting paid to do a job that lets me be around such silly people. Sure my co-workers have bad days like the rest of us, but it’s the possibility of laughter that gets us through the miserable times. It’s kind of embarrassing how much I laugh during the day with these people.

4. Have Simple Pleasures
My fire-engine read coffee maker, FOX25 morning news, driving into work in my Mazda3, the DVR, our new bedroom carpet, the sound of my beagle snoring in her bunk, pomegranates and the possibility of owning an Apple Macbook are all things that make me appreciate getting out of bed in the morning.

5. Connect With People
I’ve been trying to climb out of my self-imposed social awkwardness shyness shell at work by talking to people in the elevators at work. I’ve been advised by one of my co-workers Rick (who is so awesome that he has 3 work wives including me although he doesn’t know it yet) to just get in the elevator, don’t make eye contact and look down at the floor. He knows elevators stress me out. I’ve had a past experience riding in the elevator with the president of the company that found me asking him the destination of a mysterious button in the elevator. (It turns out the button is installed in only one of the three elevators that goes to the roof of the building, but I asked him if it was the “mechanical penthouse” which made absolutely no sense at all.) But I press on trying to be friendly and open to idle chatter and small talk while taking the ride from the fourth floor down. It’s good for me to step out of my comfort zone although I don’t know how good it is for my reputation as I’m not very good at it yet.

6. Learn
I recently took a business trip to the Southwest which involved visiting San Luis and Tijuana, Mexico. It became painfully obvious to me that my passionate teenage resentment to learning a foreign language did finally catch up with me. I found myself in a country where I would have benefited knowing how to speak and read Spanish. While relying on the kindness of fluent strangers, I realized that I did myself a disservice by hating Spanish. Had I made an honest effort in high school to learn the language, I would have been comfortable ordering food in Mexico without having to point at a taco like some deaf mute. In my position at work, I regularly interact with people in Mexico that speak English far better than I could ever hope to speak Spanish. I was foolish to hate learning a foreign language and didn’t realize back then that being bi-lingual would have been a substantial asset to my career. My advice is to be always be open to learning new things because you never know when you might need to know what it is you don’t know now.

7. Rethink Your Mornings and Evenings
I’ve begun trying to get in the habit of respecting a routing to ease my daily stress. I have an automated coffee maker and now I set the coffee maker to 6am so that when I wake up in the morning, I won’t have to stumble over to it trying to coordinate placing the filter in the basket and not spilling coffee grinds everywhere because I’m half awake. I do my best to lay out my clothes the night before and make sure the dishwasher is filled with the dirty dishes of the day so Spencer can run a cycle the following morning. I’m all about fine-tuning the morning/evening routines. It’s helped me get to work earlier and has allowed me to go to bed happy.

8. Celebrate Your Successes
It’s so easy for me to berate myself for the things that I haven’t accomplished yet. But when I think right this very instant about a recent success, I’ll have to be proud of surviving this first year without my mother. Of course I knew that I could survive after she died on November 29th of last year, but I secretly feared that my feelings about her death would spill over into work. I worried that I would be so consumed by grief that it would negatively impact my job performance. I imagined being called into the office by my boss asking why my performance had tanked or finding myself at the local pharmacy every month getting a refill of Prozac just so I could get through the day. But I managed to be very strong this year and not let my feelings about what happened to my mom affect me at work. Hardly anyone that has worked with me knew how deeply I missed my mother this year and I’m proud that I was able to separate my personal life from my work life. It’s this secret success I’m most proud of.

Acupuncher: Punch Your Bunion into Submission!

I am a regular reader of The Bunion Relief blog and I recently posted a response to a question posed about satisfaction with bunion surgery. I happened to visit the blog tonight to see what others had posted about their own surgery experiences and came across an interesting post from a guy who invented The Bunion Buster. Essentially he’s promoting his method of “Acupuncher” which involves a device he’s invented with what appears to be a rubber ball at the end of a stick that you use to punch your bunions into submission.

Here is his post:

There is a 100% natural way to cure bunions But NO one wants to know about it..I know Because I cured Mine… If I could Find Someone ANYONE to try My Method the world would Know as well.. But I have been Spitting into the wind for so Long I guess Know One WILL EVER KNOW! Using Acupressue and Relexology is The way But It a Certain Kind Of Acupressure… AcuPUNCHER… Thats Right You have to Punch That bunion into Submission… I am So Tired Of Spinning My Wheels To Let everyone Know…BunionBusters.org Everyone thinks its about the money… Well For Podiatrist it is about The Money… For Me Its about The Recognition! Which it seems I will NEVER HAVE because No one wants to try a 100% natural method…

I visited his website, read the pitch about his Bunion Busting System and downloaded the video. I consider myself open minded and I simply cannot understand how building up a tolerance to slamming a hard rubber ball against a bunion will eventually push the bone back into its natural position.

I noticed his website has less than 50 hits and it’s no wonder since his message lacks a certain marketing finesse. In describing his product he insults anyone who is considering surgery or has ever had surgery by saying the surgery, “…is a REALLY DUMB thing to do to your feet.”

He wants 10 people to send him $40 (plus $10 for shipping) for the bunion busting system and in return over a six week period the user is supposed to send photos of their progress in return for a portion of their $40 back: 2-3 weeks ($10 back), 3-4 weeks ($10 back) and finally 5-6 weeks ($10 back). Or send him a picture of not having a bunion anymore and he’ll send back $40. It seems you’re sending him $50 and he’s returning to you $30 for a nice profit of $20 per participant. But the overall purpose would be a patent since, “YOU CAN’T PATENT A PRODUCT THAT YOU’VE ALREADY SOLD!”

So if you have a bunion and also happen to be a sadomasochist, the Bunion Buster just might be the solution for you.

My Left Foot

I had my second Austin Bunionectomy done on Friday, March 9th at 7:30am at Framingham Metro west Hospital. Overall, everything went very well aside from one small hiccup: I woke up during the surgery and could hear the saw. I asked the anesthesiologist to “…give me more juice” and away I went. Good thing I couldn’t feel anything because the sound just about freaked me out. (Also a good thing that this was my last foot surgery because I don’t think I could have gone through this again knowing what a saw hitting my bone actually sounds like!)
Unlike the first surgery in July 2006, my doctor had to give me a little extra metal. The screw wasn’t holding as firmly as he would have liked so he added a few permanent staples in there for good measure. I don’t know if that’s why it hurt so much post-op, but I felt the pain much earlier than last time. But Percoset is a wonderful medication.
Spencer drove me home and I immediately took my Percoset and went to bed. That’s pretty much all I’ve been doing since Friday. Sleeping and taking drugs. You’re supposed to ice the foot all the time and make sure to elevate it. This has been difficult because I’ve had to sleep on my back. I’m a stomach sleeper and I miss flipping over. But the pills certainly help.
My foot just aches and throbs. I was concerned about my follow-up appointment this morning with Dr. Parlon because something didn’t feel right down there. Being that my foot was all bandaged up, I couldn’t really unwrap it for inspection. However, the good news is all is well. I did have a lot of post-operative bleeding and the foot is very swollen, but nothing out of the ordinary. I go back to his office on March 19th for the suture removal and then a follow up visit in six weeks. I’ll be hobbling around in my bootie for a while, but the worst is over.
I joke about wearing sandals and flip-flops this Summer, but really what I’m looking forward to is being pain free. I’m hoping to become more active after having both bunions removed and being able to walk long distances without the stabbing pain. I couldn’t care less about strapping on high heels. I’m just not that kind of chick.
If you’re interested in seeing what my foot looked like from the first surgery, send me an email at KimPerry@gmail.com and I’ll forward you an invite to my Kodak Easy Share Gallery that contains photos of my right foot after surgery. Also, the link above will show you an animated video of the surgery I just had done. If you know of anyone considering having their bunions removed and have questions–send them my way. I strangely love to talk about the surgery because the whole experience has been very positive and not at all what I would have expected. I think there are a lot of misconceptions out there surrounding having the surgery done and I’d love to dispel the myths based on my first hand experience.

My Left Foot

I had my second Austin Bunionectomy done on Friday, March 9th at 7:30am at Framingham Metro west Hospital. Overall, everything went very well aside from one small hiccup: I woke up during the surgery and could hear the saw. I asked the anesthesiologist to “…give me more juice” and away I went. Good thing I couldn’t feel anything because the sound just about freaked me out. (Also a good thing that this was my last foot surgery because I don’t think I could have gone through this again knowing what a saw hitting my bone actually sounds like!)

Unlike the first surgery in July 2006, my doctor had to give me a little extra metal. The screw wasn’t holding as firmly as he would have liked so he added a few permanent staples in there for good measure. I don’t know if that’s why it hurt so much post-op, but I felt the pain much earlier than last time. But Percoset is a wonderful medication.

Spencer drove me home and I immediately took my Percoset and went to bed. That’s pretty much all I’ve been doing since Friday. Sleeping and taking drugs. You’re supposed to ice the foot all the time and make sure to elevate it. This has been difficult because I’ve had to sleep on my back. I’m a stomach sleeper and I miss flipping over. But the pills certainly help.

My foot just aches and throbs. I was concerned about my follow-up appointment this morning with Dr. Parlon because something didn’t feel right down there. Being that my foot was all bandaged up, I couldn’t really unwrap it for inspection. However, the good news is all is well. I did have a lot of post-operative bleeding and the foot is very swollen, but nothing out of the ordinary. I go back to his office on March 19th for the suture removal and then a follow up visit in six weeks. I’ll be hobbling around in my bootie for a while, but the worst is over.

I joke about wearing sandals and flip-flops this Summer, but really what I’m looking forward to is being pain free. I’m hoping to become more active after having both bunions removed and being able to walk long distances without the stabbing pain. I couldn’t care less about strapping on high heels. I’m just not that kind of chick.

If you’re interested in seeing what my foot looked like from the first surgery, send me an email at KimPerry@gmail.com and I’ll forward you an invite to my Kodak Easy Share Gallery that contains photos of my right foot after surgery. Also, the link above will show you an animated video of the surgery I just had done. If you know of anyone considering having their bunions removed and have questions–send them my way. I strangely love to talk about the surgery because the whole experience has been very positive and not at all what I would have expected. I think there are a lot of misconceptions out there surrounding having the surgery done and I’d love to dispel the myths based on my first hand experience.